What is the Community Information Database?
Who developed the Community Information Database?
Why a Community Information Database?
Who can use the CID?
What can the CID be used for?
How many indicators are there in the CID?
Can data be downloaded from the CID?
How can users access and select data about communities?

What is the Community Information Database?

The Community Information Database (CID) is a free internet-based resource developed to provide communities, researchers, and governments with access to consistent and reliable socio-economic and demographic data and information for all communities across Canada. It was designed to provide rural communities with access to data and information in an easily useable form to help with community development and planning.

The Community Information Database enables complex data to be easily and quickly handled and displayed, with the capability to display a large selection of data through interactive maps, tables, and charts.  With visual graphics and colours, the CID allows for more intuitive analysis of community level data.

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Who developed the Community Information Database?

The CID was developed by the Government of Canada’s Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat in collaboration with the provinces and territories, other government departments, and community groups.

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Why a Community Information Database?

Rural communities and citizens have always had a need for quality data that provide a basis for informed and realistic decision-making.  Although there are several sources for local data in Canada, community level data remained inaccessible and complicated.  In the past, it was a challenge for rural communities to gather and access available community data and there were challenges relating to the consistency of data across governments.  By presenting data in an accessible and dynamic way, the Community Information Database allows for increased awareness and understanding of quantitiative information.

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Who can use the CID?

The primary users of the CID are rural community groups, citizens and leaders, researchers and practitioners, and government policy makers.  The CID is also useful for other groups including businesses, Federal, Provincial, Territorial and Municipal Governments, libraries, universities, colleges and schools.

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What can the CID be used for?

The CID allows users to analyse trends and changes at the community-level in various ways, including through tables, charts and maps.  The CID also allows users to examine trends at the national, provincial and territorial, economic region, and census division levels.

Rural communities, government departments, and community development practitioners have used the CID for program development, community planning, informed decision-making, proposal writing, educational purposes, comparing community performance, creating community and regional profiles, and economic development.

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How many indicators are there in the CID?

The CID is the only application to offer a broad range of community-level data and information for all communities across Canada.  With more than 500 economic, demographic, and social indicators and indices, the CID is one of the most innovative rural development tools in Canada and the world.

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Can data be downloaded from the CID?

The CID is one of the few applications which allow users to download complete datasets in various formats.  Datasets can be downloaded in Excel and Beyond20/20 tables, and text files which can be useful for performing additional community level analysis.

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How can users access and select data about communities?

The CID is one of the very few applications in Canada to use a dynamic mapping interface as a central tool to access and select data about communities.

Because of its unique integration of a full data management application (Beyond 20/20) and a mapping interface (GéoClip), the CID is a leading web-based data dissemination tool, in Canada and abroad. For example, users can select an area or group of communities for an analysis by using the circular and rectangular selection tools.  Users can then conduct a socio-economic analysis of the selected study area.

The advanced search feature allows users to perform queries (e.g. users can select all communities with an average family income of between $30,000 and $60,000) to perform socio-economic analyses on specific types of communities.  CID users can also manually select communities (e.g. coastal communities) and perform a socio-economic analysis on these communities.

For more information about how to use the CID, click on the following link:
Tutorials
About CID

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Go to Data

Rural Fact

Immigrants represent the smallest share of rural population in: Newfoundland and Labrador (1%); Nunavut (1.5%); Quebec (2%); Saskatchewan (2.6%); Prince Edward Island (2.9%); Northwest Territories (3%); New...